Archives for posts with tag: Photography

Something positive out of the Central African Republic: recently two photo-journalists rescued a large archive of photographer Samuel Fosso’s prints and negatives from looters in Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, which has been fractured by serious religious violence for the past few months. I’m been mesmerized by Fosso’s work since I came across his elaborately costumed self portraits in a book a few years ago and am glad to know his archive will not be lost. Still the situation in CAR is dire from the descriptions of the photographers who saved the prints, but hopefully with increasing international pressure a peaceful resolution might be negotiated soon.

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…are profiled in this CNN article. This exciting new generation of camera wielders are rapidly changing the image of the continent and many share their work with thousands of followers on instagram (check out “truthslinger”‘s profile and the incredible images of life in Kenya he shares with 35k followers). I especially like the “Future Memories” series by Michael Tsegaye that captures bleak frames of recent large-scale Addis Ababa construction projects juxtaposed with more rural imagery (cattle, hand-washing clothes, and a great one of silhouetted wooden scaffolding). I don’t usually love black and white photography, but in this case, the medium does a perfect job of capturing the rapid inevitableness of the fading and cracking that the buildings will endure as they age. Do these images give a glimpse into the memories of this new wave of large-scale construction projects? Will they be remembered differently than the grand independence era towers and monuments that now look painfully optimistic in photographs from the time of their celebratory completions.

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Image Source (photographer:  Michael Tsegaye)

The photographer who shot the famous series The Hyena & Other Men (photographs of just that–Nigerian men who keep hyenas by their sides as part of their traveling act) has a new traveling exhibit entitled Kin, which he took in his homeland, South Africa. While a few of the images are stunning frames of dramatic instants (the windswept tree, the hunched, chalked boy) others are overly staged and still others feel even generic. The project lacks cohesiveness that made The Hyena and his other exhibits so powerful. Still as a visual project that seemingly lacks a central motif, I think it might be interesting to see the project as successful in conveying the challenge and resulting confusion that often ensues when one tries to tackle their homeland…as Hugo himself says, “I have deeply mixed feelings about being here.”

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Image source (photographer: Pieter Hugo)